IEC VISA: part 3 – Bunac… is it worth it?

In part 3 of this blog series I will be giving my personal account of using Bunac’s services when it came to applying for my IEC/Working Holiday visa.

Missed the first 2 parts of the series and have no idea what I’m on about? you can catch up here: Part 1 and Part 2.

Starting the process of moving to another country is completely scary, it sounds like a complicated process that you can’t even dream of doing yourself. This is where Bunac comes in. Bunac is an organisation that aims to “assist with visas, jobs, internship placements, travel planning, work abroad travel insurance, accommodation, arrival support, 24/7 emergency assistance and more”. When it comes to IEC visas, Bunac have 2 (paid) programs available; the essentials program and the unltimate program.

The essentials program £389

As stated on their website, the essentials program provides you with the essential information needed to start the visa process, including webinars & a work in Canada handbook. In addition to this you also get access to their closed facebook group, 2 nights hostel accommodation upon your arrival, with access to their resource facilities in Canada & extra job support.

The Ultimate program £529

The ultimate program contains everything within the essentials program, and also includes access to job fairs in London to help you to secure a job before your flight out.

Sounds good right? well, if you want to work in a ski resort then the ultimate program is the one for you as this is the ONLY role they help you to secure. I was adamant that I didn’t want to work in a ski resort so I decided to buy the essentials program… which essentially ended up being nearly £400 down the drain.

To Bunac or not to Bunac

Maybe I had a bad experience, but all the promises that were outlined on the website fell short. I ended up not needing the 2 nights hostel accommodation as I was staying with family. However I didn’t receive any help looking for a Job whilst i was in Canada, I sent out an email detailing my arrival which was never replied to & I ended up feeling more alone than I already did. Also it is key to note that Bunac do not help you with the application process… you still have to do everything by yourself. In hindsight I ended up paying £389 to gain access to a facebook group and a copy of the Lonely Planet’s guide to Canada.

To conclude, I would’t recommend using Bunac seeing as you have to do everything yourself, but if you are keen on securing a job offer before you head out, don’t mind working in a ski resort and have £529 to spare then you should check out their Ultimate package.

Again, this post is based on my own personal experience with Bunac, so there may be more positive accounts out there, it’s always best to do your own research before making a concrete decision 🙂

Hope this helps!!

IEC Visa: Part 2 – How to apply

Hi guys, welcome back!

In part 2 of the IEC Visa content series, we will be covering the start of the application process. If you’ve missed part 1 or want to familiarise yourself with what an IEC visa is then you can find that here.

So you’ve decided that you’re interested in moving to Canada on a working holiday visa…once you’ve checked that you meet the necessary criteria (age requirements & country eligibility) you’re good to go ahead with the application process.

How to start the application process

Starting the application process is relatively easy, so easy you can do it yourself. I made the mistake in going through Bunac, A travel agency that specialises in working and volunteering abroad opportunities. Maybe I didn’t do my research properly or utilise Bunac to its full potential, but that’s one of the reasons as to why I started this content series…to make sure that you don’t make the same mistakes that I did! (I’ll explain more about Bunac in part 3).

So anyway back to the application process. The first thing you need to do is create a profile on the canadian government website, that will be later submitted into a pool for random selection.

Upon creating your profile you will be asked a bunch of questions to check your eligibility, these questions will be pertaining to your:

  • country of citizenship
  • country of permanent residence
  • country of residence

Once these have been answered and you’ve been given the green light, you can then go on to complete your profile for submission. For this next section you will need your passport to hand and be prepared to fill in contact and identity info.

That’s it!! Now all you have to do is submit your profile to the relevant pool & wait to see if you are sent an invitation to apply.

That’s all for now folks.

In part 3 of this series we will be looking at the services that Bunac offer (in relation to the working holiday visa) & whether the services will be of any benefit to you.

Thanks for reading guys 🙂 as always if you have any specific questions you would like me to answer please drop me a message & I’ll try by best to answer them.

IEC Visa: Part 1 – What is an IEC VISA and how do I get one?

Hey guys, apologies for the length of time I have been away…there’s been a lot going on in my personal life but hopefully things will be smooth sailing from here onwards.

Before we get into this post I just want to take the time out to wish everyone well in these uncertain times, I pray that you and your loved ones are safe and healthy.

In my last post (which was a while back now) I promised a new content series surrounding everything regarding Canadian working holiday visa also known as an IEC visa. In this post I will outline exactly what an IEC visa is and how you go about obtaining one.

First thing to note is that there are 3 types of IEC visas; Young professionals, International CO-OP (Internship) and working holiday – We will be focusing on the working holiday visa

What is a working holiday visa?

As mentioned above, a working holiday visa is one of three types of IEC (International experience canada) visas.

As this is seen to be a long term ‘holiday’ (2 years maximum) the idea is that you can work in order to fund your holiday, hence the name ‘working holiday visa.

This type of visa provides you with an open work permit which means that you can pretty much do any type of work with any type of employer. However if you want to work with kids, the elderly or any one who is recognised as a vulnerable person, then you will need to undergo a medical exam.

Who can apply for a working holiday visa?

Before even thinking to apply for a working holiday visa, there’s a few criteria that you need to make sure you meet:

  1. Age requirements: Applicants need to be between the ages of 18-30 (this is for the UK – varies country to country)
  2. Country eligibility: you need to check whether the country in which you have your citizenship with, has an agreement in place that allows you to apply for the visa (you can check the list here– at the bottom of the page)

I’m interested… how can I apply?

To apply for a working holiday visa you first need to become an candidate within a pool…

I will go on to explain more about this in the next segment – which should hopefully be out within the next week.

Thanks for reading guys 🙂 If you have any specific questions you would like me to answer please drop me a message & I’ll try my best to answer them

Top 4 things to do in Oslo, Norway

Norway has a reputation for being terribly expensive, however there are many things to do that involve very little to no money at all. I have listed my top 4 things to do in Oslo, Norway below:

Vigeland sculpture park

Cost: £0

The Vigeland sculpture park is one of Oslo’s most famous tourist attractions. With over 200 different sculptures, you’ll be sure to spend a decent amount of time there taking everything in. All the sculptures are outdoors so be sure to wrap up warm if it’s cold out. However if you happen to visit on a warm day, there are plenty of green spaces for you to enjoy a picnic

The changing of the Guards

Cost: £0

Every day at 1:30pm (regardless of the weather), the changing of the Guards takes place just outside of the Royal Palace. It does tend to get rather packed so be sure to arrive a little earlier to secure your place at the front, especially if you want to capture some good shots. Overall, the change lasts for around 45 minutes, so be prepared for a lot of standing around.

Oslo Opera House

Cost: £0

The opera house is an example of breathtakingly beautiful architecture, honestly the pictures just don’t do it justice at all! Located in the city, a few steps away from Oslo central station, it is a perfect way to spend the afternoon before or after getting a bite to eat. Surprisingly, the roof is also open to the public, but be cautious as it is quite slippery when wet.

The Norsk Folkemuseum & the viking ship museum

Cost – £0 with a Oslo city pass (a 24 hour pass costs 445 NOK and gives you access to 30 museums at no extra cost, in addition to free public transport, discounts on food, tours & many more.

The Norsk Folkemuseum & the viking ship museum are located on an island called Bygdøy, which can be accessed by a boat (10-15 min journey). I believe you can get a bus also, however that does take significantly longer.

Out of the 2, the ‘Norsk Folkemuseum’ is a personal favourite. The main purpose of this museum is to show visitors just how Norwegians used to live back in the day. They achieved this by replicating life sized models of the houses, shops, schools, churches and pretty much everything that was around in that time period. The best thing is that you can actually go into these buildings and experience life as it used to be.

The Holmenkollen Ski Museum & Tower

Cost: £0 with a Oslo city pass

Just a short train ride away from Oslo central, you’ll find the world’s oldest Ski jump. After wandering around the museum detailing the vast history of the sport, you are free to take a lift straight to the top of the Ski tower. Please note that this is not for the faint hearted or those that are afraid of heights. If you do however decide to go to the top, you will be met with stunning panoramic views of the city.

Thank you for reading my top 4 things to do in Oslo! Traveling and experiencing different cultures doesn’t always have to cost the earth. Sometimes the best experiences cost the least.

Have you taken a trip to Oslo? let me know in the comments if you have or if there are any experiences that you would like to share 🙂

Travel vlogs: Grenada

I know what you’re thinking “didn’t you visit Grenada 7 months ago”… Yes, yes I did & in true Adina form, the art of procrastination took over.

Anyway after months of sitting on the footage, it’s finally up on YouTube!! 🎉 I tried my best to capture the beauty of Grenada, so hopefully this video (embedded below) does it justice!

If you would like to see what else I got up to in Grenada you can have a read of my ‘top things to do in Grenada’ here.

Thank you for watching if you did & please let me know what you think or if you have any tips on how to improve 🙂